All the ways you can pay your UBC fees

All the ways you can pay your UBC fees

Once you’ve accepted your offer of admission and registered for courses, there are many different ways to pay your tuition, student fees, and residence and meal plan fees. The payment options available will depend on the specific type of fee you’re paying, which campus you’re attending, and where you are in the world.

If you’re a Canadian student or paying from a Canadian account

Here are just a few of the ways you can pay your tuition and fees:

  • Online or telephone banking bill payment from any Canadian financial institution
  • Interac® Online from Canadian accounts at select financial institutions
  • Electronic funds transfer (EFT) from any Canadian financial institution
  • Payment at any Canadian HSBC branch (you do not have to be an HSBC customer)
  • Online credit card payment (a 1.75% convenience fee applies for certain payments)
  • In person by cheque or debit at the Student Records and Financial Services office at UNC 214 (UBC Okanagan students only)

You also have the option of:

If you’re an international student or paying from an international account

You can pay your fees in a number of ways. Here are a few options:

  • International funds transfer (IFT) with Western Union Business Solutions
  • Online credit card payment (a 1.75% convenience fee applies for certain payments)
  • Payment at any Canadian HSBC branch

Did you know?

If you’re an international student, UBC’s international funds transfer option with Western Union Business Solutions lets you pay in your home currency, secure a competitive exchange rate for up to 72 hours, and avoid additional transaction fees – no Canadian bank account required.

Step-by-step instructions

For a full list of payment options and to get step-by-step instructions for your payment method(s) of choice, check out the links below. Please note that tuition fees and residence fees are paid to different departments at UBC.

 UBC Okanagan:

UBC Vancouver:

Questions?

If you have questions about paying fees, we’re here to help!

Ready for UBC 101?

Ready for UBC 101?

Once you’ve been admitted to UBC Okanagan, it’s time to start getting to know your new home. UBC 101 is a series of online modules that will help you learn more about your campus, and take care of the basics before classes start.

What is UBC 101?

From textbooks to housing, medical insurance to degree planning, UBC 101 will set you up with the knowledge to help you succeed when you arrive on campus. This online program will:

  • Introduce you to the history, traditions, and culture of UBC Okanagan.
  • Guide you through your academic transition to university.
  • Introduce you to on-campus support services.
  • Teach you how to register for your first-year courses.

There are two UBC 101 streams:

  • The Indigenous student stream for students who self-identified as Indigenous when they applied to UBC. As an Indigenous student in this stream, your learning will be supported by the Indigenous Programs and Services Office and Indigenous peer mentor team.
  • The general student stream for all other students. In this stream, your learning will be led by an upper-year UBC Okanagan student who can answer your questions and help you take care of the essentials before classes start.

When is UBC 101?

UBC 101 starts in mid-May and runs until mid-August, but it’s a relatively small time commitment with a big pay-off:

  • The Indigenous student stream is self-paced, takes about 2 hours, and can be completed anytime between mid-May and mid-August.
  • The general student stream modules will be released every week between mid-May and mid-August. Completing the modules will take about 1 hour each week.

How to access UBC 101

All new-to-UBC Okanagan students, except Bachelor of Education students, are eligible to take part in UBC 101. You’ll be automatically enrolled in the Indigenous student stream or general student stream in mid-May.

You can access UBC 101 anytime by clicking the link to the orientation on your Canvas dashboard. That’s also where you’ll find any updates or news about the UBC 101 material.

Choosing your first-year courses

Choosing your first-year courses

As soon as you’ve been admitted to UBC, you can begin thinking about the courses you’ll take in first year. If you familiarize yourself with how to read course descriptions now, you’ll have a head start when it’s time to build your course timetable. Registration for first-year degrees at UBC Okanagan and registration for first-year degrees at UBC Vancouver both begin in June.

Review your degree requirements

It’s important to be aware of your degree requirements. These are the courses you must complete to graduate with your chosen degree. Step seven of the Next steps for admitted students guide lists the basic requirements for each degree, but some degrees may require additional courses.

For a full list of your degree requirements, check out the Academic Calendar and your faculty website:

If you have questions, you can contact Academic Advising at UBC Okanagan or an academic advisor for your faculty at UBC Vancouver.

Pay close attention to any English requirements

Most undergraduate degrees at UBC also have an English, communication, or writing requirement that applies to all students, regardless of first language or citizenship.

Most UBC faculties on either campus will require you to take three or six credits of first-year English, and you should check your faculty requirements before you register to be sure that you are taking the right ones for your program.

Start exploring your options

Most students are able to fit in a few courses beyond their degree requirements – and there’s a wide range to choose from. Taking courses outside your faculty is highly encouraged at UBC, so don’t be shy about choosing electives that take you beyond your degree and help you pursue other interests. Start exploring the Academic Calendar and see what you find!

Programs spotlight: History, law, and politics

Programs spotlight: History, law, and politics

Deepen your knowledge of the past and build on your understanding of current events by studying one of UBC’s history, law, and politics programs. The topics within these fields are wide-ranging – Indigenous studies, religion, international relations, anthropology – and can lead to a number of diverse career paths, including social work, journalism, government work, education, and more.

 

Explore your program options

International Relations

In the International Relations program at UBC Okanagan, you’ll develop a solid background in related areas of political science, history, sociology, anthropology, economics, and modern languages. The program stresses critical thinking, and will equip you with the skills necessary to assess the contours and dynamics of international politics and events – from conflicts in Afghanistan and the Congo, to the rise of women as political actors.

 

The student scoop

Michael Flood, Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

Meet Michael, a Philosophy, Politics, and Economics students who was looking for a university experience that would challenge him socially and academically.

Political Science

In the Political Science program at UBC Vancouver, you’ll study the nature, causes, and consequences of collective decisions and actions taken by groups of people embedded in cultures and institutions that structure power and authority. Topics include the nature of power, the causes of conflict, the tensions of Canadian federalism, security in the post-Cold War international system, globalization, critiques of liberal democracy, feminist analysis, democratization, the rise of Asia, and much more.

 

The student scoop

Dela Hini, Political Science

Meet Dela, a Sociology and Political Science student who found her calling by getting involved with student leadership.

Indigenous Studies

In the Indigenous Studies program at UBC Okanagan, you can build the foundational skills needed to pursue a career in government, Aboriginal Peoples organizations, Indigenous leadership roles, or resource management. Your studies will include Indigenous perspectives and governance, the justice system, land claims, traditional ecological knowledge, and the protection of heritage in the Okanagan, Canada, US, and world communities.

 

The student scoop

Duncan McCue, UBC Law

Meet Duncan, a UBC Law alum who became an award-winning reporter for the CBC.

Law

The Peter A. Allard School of Law at UBC Vancouver is one of Canada’s leading law schools, and has a strong global reputation. Innovative researchers, inspiring teachers, and outstanding graduates have established a national presence and international reach. You’ll receive a first-rate legal education that balances traditional areas of practice with emerging fields of specialization.

 


See a full list of history, law, and politics programs at UBC


 

 

Don’t forget to accept your offer of admission

Don’t forget to accept your offer of admission

If you’ve received an offer of admission to UBC, congratulations! Getting into UBC is no easy feat, so all of your hard work paid off. The next step is to formally accept your offer and pay your acceptance deposit before the deadline to confirm your spot.

 

How do you accept your offer?

To accept your offer:

  1. Log in the Student Service Centre.
  2. Click Admissions followed by Accept or Decline My Offer.
  3. Select Yes, I accept this offer.
  4. Pay your acceptance deposit ($500 if you’re a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, or $1,000 if you’re an international student). This deposit will be credited to your first term’s tuition.

 

Why do some students have different deadlines?

The deadline for you to accept your offer will depend on when your offer was made, to which degree you’ve been admitted, and which campus you will attend. Please refer to your letter of admission or your Student Service Centre account for your specific deadline.

 

Where do you find your deadline to accept?

You can find the deadline to accept your offer in two places:

  • Your letter of admission (see page 2)
  • Your Student Service Centre account (click Admissions followed by Accept or Decline My Offer)

Be sure to accept your offer on or before the stipulated deadline. Spaces at UBC are in high demand, and if you miss the deadline, your offer is likely to be withdrawn and made to another student.

 

 

International students in Canada: Remember to update your study permit

International students in Canada: Remember to update your study permit

If you’re an international student coming to UBC from a Canadian high school, you’ll need to take action to extend your study permit while you are in Canada.

You must extend your study permit within 90 days of receiving written confirmation of your high school completion (even if your study permit has not expired), or before your study permit expires – whichever comes first. You can start your studies at UBC if you have applied for a study permit extension and you’re waiting for your new study permit.

 

How do you apply?

If you’re in Canada and your existing permit is still valid, you can apply to extend your study permit online for UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver. Be sure to apply before your study permit becomes invalid.

You can only apply for a study permit extension when you are in Canada. If you have travel plans, you can apply for an extension before you leave Canada using a friend’s Canadian address. If you have already left, you may come back to Canada before your study permit and Temporary Resident Visa (if applicable) expire(s). If you will not be returning to Canada before your study permit becomes invalid or expires, apply for an initial study permit at UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver from outside of Canada as soon as possible.

Learn about the differences between applying inside or outside Canada and be sure to review our travelling to Canada guide.

 

When do you apply?

You should apply as soon as you receive your letter of admission from UBC. If you are in Canada you must apply within 90 days after written confirmation that you’ve completed high school first becomes available, or before your study permit expires – whichever comes first.

 

What if you still have questions?

To find out more about your study permit requirements, read through our UBC International Student Guide for UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver. If you still have questions, our International Student Advising team at UBC Okanagan and UBC Vancouver is here for you.

 

 

International students: Remember to apply for a study permit

International students: Remember to apply for a study permit

Unless you’re a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada, you’ll likely need to apply and receive a study permit before you travel to Canada and start your UBC classes, and you’ll need to ensure your permit remains valid for the duration of your studies. Study permits are issued by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). Learn more about study permits at UBC Okanagan and UBC Vancouver.

Depending on your country of citizenship, you may also need a Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) or an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) to travel to Canada (U.S. citizens are exempt). Once your initial study permit application is approved, you will automatically be issued a TRV or eTA.

 

When do you apply?

You should apply for a study permit online as soon as you receive your letter of admission to UBC. Applications can take several months to process.

 

How do you apply?

To prepare your application, visit UBC’s step-by-step initial study permit tutorial for UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver. Here, you’ll learn about the application process, how to fill out the application form, and what documents to provide.

If you are currently a resident of Antigua and Barbuda, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Morocco, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, or Vietnam, and are considering applying through the Student Direct Stream, learn about pre-payment of tuition for UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver. Please see our frequently asked questions.

If you are a US citizen, US permanent resident, or a resident of Greenland or St. Pierre and Miquelon, you can apply for a study permit at the airport or land border crossing on arrival. Read through the study permit page to find out more, and remember to bring all your original documents with you.

 

What if you’re already studying in Canada?

You are coming to UBC from a Canadian high school

If you have been studying in secondary/high school in Canada and you have been admitted to UBC, you must apply to extend your study permit. You must do this within 90 days after receiving written confirmation of high school completion (since your study permit will automatically become invalid) or before your study permit expires – whichever comes first.

You should apply as soon as you receive your letter of admission from UBC.

  • If you are in Canada, apply for a study permit extension for UBC Okanaganor UBC Vancouver.
  • You can only apply for a study permit extension when you are in Canada. If you are travelling and you have already left Canada, you may come back to Canada before your study permit and Temporary Resident Visa (if applicable) expire(s). If you will not return to Canada before your study permit and your Temporary Resident Visa (if applicable) expire(s), apply for an initial study permit from outside of Canada as soon as possible. Learn more about what to do for UBC Okanaganand UBC Vancouver.

You are transferring to UBC from a Canadian college or university

If you already have a valid study permit for post-secondary study in Canada, you might be able to use that permit to study at UBC.

  • If you did not complete your previous program and your study permit has not expired, you must inform the government by changing your Designated Learning Institution (DLI)online via your MyCIC account.
  • If you completed a program at your previous institution, you must extend your study permit for UBC Okanaganor UBC Vancouver within 90 days after you received written notification of program completion or before your study permit expires – whichever comes first.

 

What do you need to prepare before travelling to Canada?

Before making travel plans, be sure to carefully review all pages of our Travelling to Canada Guide for UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver to learn about what to bring, health insurance, the arrival process, and more.

 

If you still have questions

The UBC International Student Guide for UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver is a great resource and reference handbook for everything you need to know about coming to UBC. If you still have questions, our International Student Advising team at UBC Okanagan and UBC Vancouver is here for you.

We also recommend that you enroll in iPREP, a pre-arrival course designed for new students to learn about immigration documents, health insurance, banking, cell phones, and more.

 

 

Top five tips for choosing your university

Top five tips for choosing your university

Choosing which universities to apply to isn’t easy. Your friends might be set on one school, your parents might be insisting on another, but something about a different university really caught your eye. How do you know which one is right for you? Here are a few tips to help you get started.

 

Consider how the school stacks up

A university education is a big investment, and the school you choose sends a signal to the world. At a top-ranked school, you’ll enjoy one of the best educations in the world and join the workforce with a wealth of options. Graduating with a degree from a top 40 research university like UBC says something about you, and can open doors around the globe when you’re looking to begin your career.

 

Check out your academic options

If you have a program in mind, check out what and where you’ll learn. If you’re still not sure what to study, look for a school and degree that will give you lots of options down the road. Some universities provide the opportunity for combined programs, or let you select from a range of different electives across multiple subjects while still fulfilling the requirements for your degree. At UBC, you can choose from among 42 undergraduate degrees and hundreds of opportunities for specialization.

 

Choose a place you want to live

It’s important that the campus you choose has the right vibe for you. Universities can be rural or urban, in a major metropolis, or form a mini-city of its own. Some schools place more of an emphasis on academics, while others have a tradition of excellence in sports or the arts. UBC’s Okanagan and Vancouver campuses both have inclusive, well-rounded communities that will welcome and support you in whatever you’re passionate about, and each one offers a distinctive experience and unique path to a UBC degree.

 

Picture yourself on campus

Schools have started re-opening their campuses for tours, and many also offer online events for you to get to know the campuses you’re considering. At UBC, our in-person campus tours are back, and you’re invited to check out the facilities in person. If you’re unable to make it to Vancouver or the Okanagan, you can take advantage of a live virtual campus tour from home or check us out on Instagram. You’ll get a sense of where you could be going to lectures and studying for exams, eating lunch, and hanging out with friends between classes.

 

Crunch the numbers

Going to university is an investment in your future, and the costs can add up. Tuition varies across schools, as do the living costs, financial assistance, and awards available to you. You can usually find out all you need to know about planning your finances from a university’s website. For UBC, you can easily do the math with our cost calculator.