Choosing your first-year courses

Choosing your first-year courses

As soon as you’ve been admitted to UBC, you can begin thinking about the courses you’ll take in first year. If you familiarize yourself with how to read course descriptions now, you’ll have a head start when it’s time to build your course timetable. Registration for first-year programs on the Okanagan campus and registration for first-year programs on the Vancouver campus both begin in June.

Review your degree requirements

It’s important to be aware of your degree requirements – that is, the courses you must complete to graduate with your chosen degree. Step 6 of your Registration and Orientation Guide lists the basic requirements for each degree, but some degrees may require additional courses.

For a full list of your degree requirements, check out the Academic Calendar and your faculty website:

If you have questions, you can contact Academic Advising on the Okanagan campus or a faculty academic advisor on the Vancouver campus.

Pay close attention to any English requirements

Most undergraduate degrees at UBC also have an English, communication, or writing requirement that applies to all students, regardless of first language or citizenship.

If you are required or choose to take a first-year (ENGL 100-level) course, you must meet the first-year English course entry requirement before you can register. Writing the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test is one way to do that.

To determine if you need to write the LPI test (and by when), check out the requirements for your campus:

Start exploring your options

Most students are able to fit in a few courses beyond their degree requirements – and there’s a wide range to choose from. Taking courses outside your faculty is highly encouraged at UBC, so don’t be shy about choosing electives that take you beyond your degree and help you pursue other interests. Start exploring the Academic Calendar and see what you find!

Did you know that UBC’s on Snapchat?

Did you know that UBC’s on Snapchat?

If you want to see what life looks like on UBC’s Okanagan and Vancouver campuses, check us out on Snapchat at youbcsnaps.

You’ll have a chance to tour campus with our student ambassadors, deep dive into programs and degrees, follow co-op students on the job, and experience a day in the life of different UBC students. You’ll meet professors, see inside residences and campus buildings, and get the scoop on the best spots to eat, study, and hang out between classes.

See what we’re snapping

Inside Imagine UBC orientation with Izzie

UBC’s Okanagan campus through the eyes of student ambassador Camille 

Live from UBC’s Vancouver campus with residence advisor Nathan

 

Frequently asked questions from Canadian high school applicants

Frequently asked questions from Canadian high school applicants

This year, approximately 18,000 students in Canada submitted applications for 7,000 first-year places at UBC. When you consider that every applicant gets to indicate a first and second choice of degree, that’s almost 36,000 applications.

We’ve now posted first-choice decisions for all Canadian applicants on the Student Service Centre. If you were offered admission, congratulations! If you were not offered admission, thank you for submitting an application and giving us the opportunity to get to know you better through your academic successes and Personal Profiles. We wish we could admit all qualified applicants, but with more applications than spaces, it’s just not possible. If you’re curious, here’s how UBC makes admissions decisions.

At this point, you might have a few questions:

What should I do if I’ve been placed on a waitlist? When will I receive a final decision?

If your application has been waitlisted, your application status will indicate when you can expect to receive a final – yes or no – decision. For the majority of programs at UBC, the deadline to accept offers of admission is June 1. At that point, we’ll know how many students have accepted their offers. If fewer students accepted their offers than expected, we’ll make a few more offers to waitlisted applicants. If enough students accepted their offers, we’ll notify students on the waitlist that no additional offers will be made.

Our best advice is to move forward with other post-secondary plans in case we don’t make additional offers in June. If we do make more offers, we hope they’ll be considered, but we understand if students have made plans to study elsewhere.

What about my second choice?

Our goal is to have all second-choice decisions to students by June 1. If you received an offer of admission for your first choice, we’ll stop there unless you contact us to request otherwise. If you’re waitlisted for your first choice, we’ll evaluate your second choice too and notify you in mid-June about your first choice.

If I accept my second choice but I’m waitlisted for my first choice, will you still evaluate my first choice?

Yes, we always evaluate first choices, whether you accept or decline your second-choice offer. All waitlisted applicants will receive a final decision in mid-June.

I’ve been admitted to my first choice, but now I would prefer my second choice. Will you still evaluate my second choice?

We always assume that your first choice is what you prefer. If you’ve received an offer of admission for your first choice, we’ll only evaluate your second choice if you contact us and if there is still space available in your second-choice degree.

Where can I find my application status?

The best source of information on your application is always the Student Service Centre. When you log in to your account, you’ll find an up-to-date status for each of your degree choices.

International students in Canada: Remember to update your study permit

International students in Canada: Remember to update your study permit

If you’re an international student who is already attending high school in Canada on a study permit, this permit does not allow you to study at the university level. You will need to obtain a post-secondary study permit before starting your first term at UBC.

How do I apply?

If you’re in Canada and your existing permit is still valid, you can apply for an extension/change of conditions. If you’re outside Canada, you must apply for a new study permit.

When do I apply?

You should apply for a post-secondary study permit as soon as you’re admitted to UBC.

What if I still have questions?

More guidance on study permit requirements can be found in UBC’s International Student Guide.

Jump Start: Your official welcome to life at UBC

Jump Start: Your official welcome to life at UBC

If you’re entering first year on UBC’s Okanagan or Vancouver campus, you’ll want to register for Jump Start. It doesn’t matter if you’re a domestic or an international student, whether you plan to live on or off campus, Jump Start is for you.

Okanagan campus

Jump Start is a week-long program designed to introduce you to the University, your faculty, and new friends on UBC’s Okanagan campus.

On August 25 and 26, you’ll have a chance to move in and get settled. From August 27 to 31, you’ll take part in workshops and fun activities that not only prepare you for the academic year, but also help you create your community at UBC. By the end, you’ll be well on your way to feeling at home on campus and in Kelowna.

“Attending the Jump Start program was a fantastic decision. Not only did I meet new people, I became more comfortable with the transition of moving away from home.” 

 

– Ammar Riyadh, Bachelor of Science, Okanagan campus

Registration for Jump Start on UBC’s Okanagan campus opens on May 4, 2018 and closes on July 31, 2018Learn more and register today

Vancouver campus

Jump Start is a week-long program designed to introduce you to the University, your faculty, and new friends on UBC’s Vancouver campus.

  • If you plan to live on campus, your Jump Start experience will run from August 25 to 31.
  • If you plan to live off campus, your Jump Start experience will run from August 27 to 31.

Not sure what your living arrangements will be? No problem! You can register now and decide later.

As a Jump Start participant, you can start creating your community on campus and developing a clear idea of what it takes to be successful at UBC. Best of all, you’ll have the chance to do it all before classes even begin.

Jump Start activities are provided free of charge by UBC. You’re only responsible for the cost of your meals and on-campus accommodation (if you’re living in residence). Registration for Jump Start on UBC’s Vancouver campus closes on July 5, 2018Learn more and register today

 

Get ready for Destination UBC 2018

Get ready for Destination UBC 2018

We can’t wait to meet those of you who have registered for Destination UBC on the Okanagan campus and the Destination UBC Aboriginal Student Welcome on the Vancouver campus. Hundreds of newly admitted students from all over Canada will be coming here to celebrate, explore UBC, and start preparing for life after high school.

What should I bring?

Your Destination UBC confirmation package includes a list of important personal items that you’ll want to bring. There will be lots of indoor and outdoor games, plus activities like yoga, running, and walking tours, so be sure to pack the clothing and footwear you’ll need. If you play an instrument, bring it along too. Above all else, come with a positive attitude ­– and we’ll take care of the rest.

What if I’m registered as part of the travel reimbursement program?

Once you register for Destination UBC, we’ll send you an electronic package that outlines the next steps for booking your travel. In the meantime, you can review the How will I be reimbursed? details for your campus (Okanagan or Vancouver) online.

What next?

Follow along on Snapchat, and use the #destinationubc hashtag to share the beginning of your UBC story and find other students on Twitter and Instagram. If you’re on the Okanagan campus, we have a Facebook group too. Who knows – you might make a few friends before you even arrive!

International students: Remember to apply for a study permit

International students: Remember to apply for a study permit

Unless you’re a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada, you’ll need to obtain a study permit before you start classes at UBC and ensure it remains valid for the duration of your studies. Study permits are issued by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).

Depending on your country of origin, you may also need a temporary resident visa and/or a medical examination.

When do I apply?

You should apply for a study permit as soon as you’re admitted to UBC. Applications can take several months to process, particularly if you’re from a country with additional visa requirements. If you’re a U.S. student, see below.

What documentation will I need?

When you apply for a study permit, IRCC may require you to provide the following:

  • Your letter of admission from UBC
  • Proof of funds adequate to support you for your first year of study in Canada
  • Your passport
  • Photo(s) that meet IRCC specifications
  • Your completed application forms

How do I apply?

  • Online: If you meet certain conditions, you may be able to apply for your permit online.
  • By mail: If you are unable to apply online, you must complete a paper application. Your first step should be to visit the website of the Canadian visa application centre for your country. Check which documents are required, determine if you need a temporary resident visa and/or medical examination, and confirm how to mail your application and pay the application fee.

What if I’m a U.S. student?

If you’re a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, you have several options for applying for a study permit:

  • Online: Use the online application process.
  • By mail: Mail your paper application to the Canadian visa application centre for your country. If you are in the United States, apply through the visa application centre in Los Angeles.
  • On arrival: Apply on arrival at a major immigration entry point in Canada. Come with your documentation ready and be prepared to spend an hour or two completing the process. If you’re under 17 years of age, you’ll require custodianship. If you’re between 17 and 19 years of age, the immigration officer will decide whether you need a custodian. Custodianship is generally not required at the port of entry if you’re travelling with your parents.

What if I’m already studying in Canada?

If you’re an international student who is already attending high school in Canada on a study permit, this permit does not allow you to study at the university level. You should apply for an extension/change of conditions as soon as you’re admitted to UBC.

What if I still have questions?

More guidance on study permit requirements can be found in UBC’s International Student Guide.

How can I maintain my offer of admission?

How can I maintain my offer of admission?

First of all, remember that your offer of admission to UBC was based on a combination of your academic profile and your Personal Profile. So when we receive your final grades, we’ll be looking at them alongside your Personal Profile.

Our process and timeline

In May, we’ll review grades for students who received first-round offers and students who self-reported and were admitted in the March-to-April timeframe. That’s when we’ll verify that the grade information submitted to UBC is accurate. If we have any concerns with your grades, we’ll reach out to you directly.

In July, we’ll review final grades. If you meet the conditions on your offer of admission, we’ll update your offer to reflect that.

What you can do

Most students are looking for a definitive answer: “Tell me exactly how much my grades can drop before I lose my offer.” But we can’t say: “Everyone whose grades drop more than X%, or drop below Y%, will lose their offers.”

Each student’s situation is unique and we review changes in academic standing on a case-by-case basis. We don’t like to withdraw offers, but we must ensure that they’re awarded consistently and fairly, and that you have a solid foundation for success.

Certain grade changes may cause us to look at your application more closely when your final grades are submitted. Our best advice is to keep working hard to present your best final grades so we can confirm your offer of admission to UBC.