Which UBC Forestry program is for you?

Which UBC Forestry program is for you?

Are you looking for a degree that challenges you academically, provides exciting opportunities to enrich your university experience, and opens the door to a breadth of in-demand careers? UBC’s Faculty of Forestry – one of the world’s top ranked forestry schools – has six degrees that span topics from wood engineering and sustainability to soil science and urban planning.

No matter which Forestry program you study, you’ll be part of a diverse, close-knit community where faculty get to know their students by name, and where you have ample opportunities to dig deeper into your specialization with hand on field and lab work, research, travel, and unique classroom experiences.

 

Bachelor of Science in Forest Sciences

If you have an inquisitive mind and want to unravel the mysteries of nature, Forest Sciences is an ideal program for you. You’ll study the scientific principles related to the growth and development of forest organisms and the ecology of plant and animal communities. This knowledge will help you better understand aspects of our forests such as wildlife, fire, insects, diseases, soil, tree genetics, and forest regeneration. When you graduate, you may be eligible for the Registered Professional Biologist accreditation through the College of Applied Biology, and for the Registered Professional Forester accreditation through the Association of BC Forest Professionals.

“I like the flexibility in terms of choosing what topic within Forest Sciences that I can focus on. There are suggested specializations, such as hydrology or entomology, but I’m also able to choose a topic that I’m interested in. There is a specialization in International Forestry, where students are required to spend time abroad and learn about forest ecosystems in a global context.”

–Jennifer Hong, alumna, Forest Sciences

Learn more about Forest Sciences

 

Bachelor of Science in Forestry

The interdisciplinary Forestry program combines biological, physical, and social sciences with technology to advance your understanding of sustainable forest management. Among other areas, you’ll develop your knowledge in topics spanning forest planning and management to the operational aspects of extracting timber.

“I decided to go into Forest Resources Management at UBC because I love being in the forest. I am extremely passionate about protecting our natural resources and managing them properly. It has given me the opportunity to learn to manage B.C. forests in a sustainable manner. The field schools provide a safe outdoor learning environment that allows students to apply their skills prior to working in the industry.”

–Thomson Kennedy, 4th year, Forest Resources Management

Learn more about Forestry

 

Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources Conservation

Have you ever considered working in conservation? Do you want to play an active role in protecting and managing our natural environment, such as wildlife, forests, rivers, oceans, and land? In Natural Resources Conservation, the faculty’s most popular degree program, you’ll learn about the maintenance of habitats and the persistence of diverse natural resources, and gain a better understanding of the balance that is needed among environmental, social, economic, cultural, and aesthetic values. With certain criteria, students may be eligible for the Registered Professional Biologist accreditation through the College of Applied Biology.

“The Natural Resources Conservation Program will give you the skills and knowledge to meet the big challenges our world is facing right now. It will help you think holistically about how different disciplines can come together to solve our biggest environmental challenges and achieve a balance between our increasing needs for goods and services and the protection of our ecosystems.”

–Valentina Coy, 3rd year, Natural Resources Conservation

Learn more about Natural Resources Conservation

 

Bachelor of Science in Wood Products Processing

UBC – home to one of the tallest wood buildings on the planet – is considered a world leader in the development and advancement of innovative and sustainable wood products. In the wood products program, you’ll gain a broad understanding of wood science, business, and advanced manufacturing operations while you develop essential transferable skills such as problem-solving, communication, leadership, and teamwork.

“If you are interested in building a successful professional career in an innovative, creative, and sustainable industry, then the Wood Products Processing program will provide you with a strong foundation. The faculty offers a strong co-op program, a positive tri-mentoring program, and a range of leadership-building classes.”

–Jonathan Jean-Hwa Chu, 4th year, Wood Products Processing

Learn more about Wood Products Processing

 

Bachelor of Urban Forestry

The Urban Forestry program – the first of its kind in Canada – teaches you about planning and managing urban green spaces and ecosystems for human welfare, ecological health, and the protection of our cities’ support systems. You could learn how to tackle the problems arising from increased urban populations and global warming, and help create more sustainable and greener communities.

“The program gave me the ability to balance an urban lifestyle while pursuing my passion for the outdoors. When I was just getting started, I quickly realized that the industry is buzzing and that the skills I was learning were in high demand. The design aspects of the program allowed my ideas to come to life and curated a set of practical skills for producing green sustainable landscapes. My favourite part of the urban forestry program was solving real-life problems by using green design, making cities more liveable. The integrated foundation of traditional forestry, landscape architecture, and design makes the urban forestry program the most competitive degree in the expanding greenspace management industry.”

– Reginald Daniel, Alumnus, Urban Forestry

Learn more about Urban Forestry

 

Forest Bioeconomy Sciences and Technology (BEST)

Are you interested in being a part of the world’s shift from fossil fuels to sustainable sources? The BEST program is the faculty’s newest BSc degree and the first in Canada to focus on the growing bioeconomy including the production of renewable biological resources and transforming them into valuable products. You’ll learn how to design and develop innovative products and biofuels from forest and plant materials, as well as guide government policies and land use strategies for a sustainable future.

“Starting this September, the BEST program will enrol its inaugural class, learning the sciences required to address the global challenge of combatting climate change using biobased alternatives.”

-Dr Scott Renneckar, Program Director Forestry Bioeconomy Sciences and Technology

Learn more about Forest Bioeconomy Sciences and Technology

 

Elevate Your Degree

Choosing to do your undergraduate degree in Forestry opens some exciting doors. Discover how you can also major in business or education, be a part of an exchange program, connect with mentors, or enjoy field schools.

 

Co-operative education opportunities

Completing a co-op is your chance to get real-world experience, make an average salary of $3,133 per month, and begin building your professional network. All six Forestry programs offer co-ops so that you can learn about possible careers and jobs in your field of interest. UBC Forestry students have completed co-ops at companies like West Fraser, Interfor, and J.D. Irving, as well as local municipalities, the provincial and federal governments, UBC’s Advanced Renewable Materials Lab, Pioneer Forest Consulting, and many more.

Check out the Forestry co-op Instagram account to see the kinds of experiences UBC students are gaining as they get their hands dirty in labs and forests, and travel as far as South Africa, India, Indonesia, Japan, Finland, and Germany. Plus, you can read students’ stories about their work terms.

 

Land One

Land One is open to a limited number of first year students looking to ease their transition to university and have a great experience while they do. In Land One, students are part of a small cohort which allows them to easily build strong connections with their instructors and peers. They receive mentoring if they need it, and opportunities for special, experiential learning such as going on field trips and enjoying hands-on activities. Learn more about this first-year study option here.

 

 

Should I work with an agent to apply to UBC?

Should I work with an agent to apply to UBC?

Have you considered working with an education consultancy, or agent, to apply to university? Researching and applying to overseas universities can be overwhelming, and an agent can sometimes simplify the process.

Before engaging with an agent, it’s important to know what your options are.

 

Do I need to work with an agent to apply to UBC?

No. Students are encouraged to apply directly to UBC and use the information provided in our Applying to UBC section. If you’re stuck or have a question about the application process, there are several ways you can connect with us:

 

What questions should I ask an agency?

Professional agencies follow standards of good practice, but not every agency is equal. If you work with an agency, you’re hiring them to perform a service for you and you should be free to ask some basic questions before committing:

  • Do you charge service fees to your clients, or do you have commission-based agreements with universities? If you charge service fees, what are they, and when should they be expected?
  • Are you certified by the American International Recruitment Council(AIRC) or other organizations or associations? Which ones? (Note that AIRC has one of the strictest certification processes for agencies to become members.)
  • Ask the advisor you are working with about their experience. They should be knowledgeable about the institutions they are promoting:
    • How many years have they been advising students about universities abroad?
    • Have they have visited UBC or the institution you are considering, or even your country of choice?
    • Have they taken any training, such as the Canada Course for Education Agents?
  • If an agent claims to have an agreement with UBC or another institution, ask to see a copy of their active agreement (not the certificate of representation on the wall, but the actual agreement).
  • Do you have the qualifications to advise on Canadian visas and study permits?

 

Important tips

  • When applying to UBC with the help of an agency, you should not have to complete any paper-based forms. The entire UBC admissions process occurs online at ubc.ca.
  • Agents are not involved in any of UBC’s scholarships– these are conducted automatically, unless you are nominated by your high school.
  • Please do not allow an agent to complete your UBC application on your behalf. This may jeopardize your application if UBC Admissions determines that your application is not an authentic submission.
  • You – not the agent – are responsible for submitting your application to UBC on time, and ensuring you meet the requirements. You are also responsible for completing all the other necessary steps to be considered for admission.

 

What an agent cannot do for you

  • Working with an agency does not increase your chances of admission or of obtaining a scholarship at UBC. All students are assessed on the merit of their grades and overall application.
  • An agent cannot write or assist in writing your Personal Profileor any part of your application.
  • An agent cannot submit false records or documents.
  • Agencies cannot access your UBC records without your consent. You must have completed a Third Party Authorization in order for your agent to have access to your UBC information from your Student Service Centre(SSC) account.
  • An agent cannot submit payments for any UBC-related fees on your behalf.

And remember – we’re here to help. If you’re having difficulty with the application process, need to know more about UBC, or have any further questions about working with an agent, please contact us.

 

Tips for creating your BCom application video interview

 

If you’re applying to UBC Sauder School of Business’s Bachelor of Commerce (BCom) program, your Personal Profile will include a video interview section. You’ll be asked to provide on-camera responses to two pre-recorded questions. We’ve created these tips to help you prepare for, and create, a strong video. Read on for more information!

 

Why is the video interview important?

In the BCom program, collaboration, in-class discussion, and public speaking are daily activities. Your ability to listen to others and to communicate your thoughts and ideas clearly are essential to your success, and, in many cases, the success of your team during group work.

If you’re intimidated by the thought of speaking on-camera, don’t worry. The questions will relate to your personal experiences and opinions, so there are no wrong answers. In fact, the video interview is a great opportunity for you to showcase how you can think critically, perform under pressure, and stand out from other applicants.

 

How to create your video interview

Within your Personal Profile, you’ll be directed to a separate online video-interview platform. Be sure to:

  1. Read all instructions thoroughly.
  2. Allow yourself ample time to test your recording equipment.
  3. Try a practice question before recording responses to two set interview questions.

Please keep in mind that you’ll only have one attempt to respond to each question. Once you’ve started to view a question, you won’t be able to pause or replay it. You’ll be given 30 seconds to think about your answer, and up to 90 seconds to record it.

 

Tips for creating your video interview

  • Take time to reflect. Think about past challenges, achievements, strengths, and beliefs.
  • Create the best recording space possible. Close all other browser windows and programs on your device. Make sure there’s good lighting in front of you. Silence all audible alarms and alerts. Eliminate loud background noises, and make sure you are free from other distractions.
  • Be confident. Maintain good posture, smile, and present yourself professionally. You’ll find these simple actions will put you in the right mindset to deliver a natural response. Do not read from prepared statements or notes.
  • Don’t dwell on mistakes. Natural speech isn’t always perfect – the occasional “umm” or mispronounced word is commonplace and to be expected. If you misspeak during your response, take a moment, breathe, and keep going. Remember, you’ll have just one attempt to answer each question – there are no do-overs.
  • Be authentic. One of the reasons we’ve incorporated the video interview into your application is to get to know you better. Don’t tell us what you think we want to hear; tell us what you want us to know about you.

We’re looking forward to learning more about you. Good luck!

 

 

Degree spotlight: Bachelor of Management

Degree spotlight: Bachelor of Management

Are you looking to use your leadership skills to make a difference in the world? Do you want to steer organizations towards doing the right thing?

UBC Okanagan’s Bachelor of Management degree is designed to help you achieve those goals.

What will you learn?

While traditional business schools might direct students to chase profits, UBC Okanagan’s program will teach you how to incorporate social, financial, and environmental sustainability into the way organizations are run.

Your first two years will offer a broad overview of management and business principles, with the option for you to focus on particular areas such as financial accounting, marketing, and management communications if you wish. Your third and fourth years will let you dive more deeply into topics that you care about, while continuing to ensure that you study a wide range of management skills. You’ll finish the program with hands-on experience creating real-life management solutions for one of UBC’s partner organizations.

After graduating, you’ll be ready to work within your community, launch your own business, or empower organizational change.

 

Student Scoop

Baljit Badhan

 

Discover how the Bachelor of Management program taught three students the skills to achieve their goals, including fighting for marginalized people in India, helping Indigenous communities in Canada, and launching their own business.

 

What makes the program unique?

Like other programs at UBC Okanagan, the Bachelor of Management degree is your chance to experience life on a close-knit campus while gaining your education at one of the world’s top 40 universities. Here are five other facts you might not know about the program:

1. Apply your management knowledge to different fields. The Bachelor of Management at UBC’s Okanagan campus is designed to let you pursue your interests and learn what sectors you might like to enter after you graduate. You’ll have the opportunity to complete a minor in Computer ScienceCultural StudiesEconomicsSociology, or Psychology.

2. Work within your community. UBC Okanagan has strong ties to local businesses, and you’ll have the chance to make a difference in those organizations. In your third year, you’ll take part in the Live Case Challenge, which asks you to create a sustainable solution to a real-life problem faced by a partnering organization.

3. Gain work experience while you study. Build your career confidence through co-op educationand explore work experience that challenges and inspires you. Co-op programs provide the opportunity for you to gain paid, full-time experience in a variety of work settings, test out possible career options, and begin building a professional network – all before graduation. You’ll benefit from a variety of support workshops, one-on-one coaching, and work experience relevant to your future career goals.

4. Build new connections and friendships.You’ll be part of the Management Student Associationon the Okanagan campus, which provides optional professional and social experiences for you during your degree, including conferences and competitions throughout the year.

5. Experience brand new facilities. The Faculty of Managementis located in a new, $68-million state-of-the-art teaching and research facility that incorporates high-tech teaching tools, training resources, and meeting spaces, and is the largest building on campus.

 

 

Join us for a live virtual campus tour!

Join us for a live virtual campus tour!

Ever wonder what life at UBC is like? Are you curious about your new classes, or how to build your community? Maybe you’d just like to see if UBC feels like the right place for you.

If so, come and join us for a live virtual campus tour! In light of COVID-19, we’re now running our tours for both UBC Okanagan and UBC Vancouver online.

You’ll be in excellent hands as you join our friendly student ambassadors for a 75-minute live virtual tour of your campus of choice, and get an in-depth overview of life at UBC. Our ambassadors are current students who are excited to share their knowledge and experiences with you, and they’re looking forward to answering your questions about what it’s like to be a UBC student.

 

Tour schedules

Tours are scheduled every Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday for UBC Okanagan.

For UBC Vancouver, you can join a tour every weekday, excluding holidays.

All tours take place using Zoom.

 

How to register

To view all upcoming tours and to register, visit the Future Student Portal’s Tours and events page and select the “On campus” tab.

 

Keep exploring

If you are unable to attend one of our live tours or you want to learn more about UBC at your own pace, you can also experience our two campuses by taking a self-guided virtual tour.

 

We’re looking forward to meeting you online!

 

 

Choosing what to study

 

A common question we’re asked here at UBC is about the difference between a degree and a program. What’s a program? What’s a degree? And why is it important to tell them apart when you’re deciding what to study?

 

Degree versus program. What’s the difference?

At UBC, your degree refers to the level and type of study you will complete during university (e.g., Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science). It’s the designation you’ll earn at graduation.

A program refers to the subject you choose to specialize in (e.g., your major in Anthropology or Biology). It’s your area of focus within your degree.

For example, if you study in the History program, you’ll earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. If you study in the Civil Engineering program, you’ll earn a Bachelor of Applied Science degree.

 

Applying to a UBC degree

When you apply to UBC, you’ll select a degree and a campus. The online application allows you to choose two degrees (a first and second choice), which can be on different campuses and in different Faculties.

Before you apply, it’s a good idea to check out UBC’s programs to get a sense of which subjects interest you most. Once you have a list of programs, you can use it to help you select the degrees you’d like to apply to.

 

Selecting your UBC program

For most degrees, you don’t have to commit to a program until your second or third year of study. But if you compile a list of programs you’re interested in when you apply to UBC, you’ll be set up to select the one you’d like to major in when it’s time to choose.

Learn more about applying to UBC and about choosing a degree and program.

 

 

Personal Profile Tips

Personal Profile Tips

Every aspiring high school student applying to UBC (and some transfer applicants too) must submit a Personal Profile as part of their online application. It’s a chance for you to tell the university about your life and accomplishments: What have they taught you about yourself and the world around you?

 

Preparing for the Personal Profile

Each of the Personal Profile questions requires short essay responses (50 to 200 words), so you’ll want to think about your answers before you start your online application. Here are three tips to keep in mind:

  • Take time to reflect. Instead of simply listing your accomplishments and experiences, tell us what you’ve learned from them.
  • Be specific. Use details to provide context and elaborate on your answers.
  • Be true to who you are. Don’t focus on what you think we want to hear. Use your unique voice to tell us what you want to say.

We’ve compiled helpful information for writing your Personal Profile, and we want all UBC applicants to have the benefits of reading these tips. Visit our Personal Profile page to learn more about what to consider before writing your profile, and how UBC will evaluate it.

 

Your Personal Profile and COVID-19

We know that, like all students around the world, you are adjusting to ongoing changes meant to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and keep everyone safe. We understand that there may currently be limited or no access to extracurricular activities at school or in your community.

Remember that when we assess your Personal Profile we take into account all of the activities you’ve done across multiple years, not just the ones you hoped to complete in Grade 11 or 12. Your examples can come from any aspect of your life, including within your family or smaller community, or the challenges you may have faced while handling disruptions from COVID-19. There are no right or wrong answers – we’re not looking for certain activities or a long list of achievements, but rather your reflections on what you’ve experienced.

 

Still have questions?

If you require any further assistance with putting together your application or need help with the Personal Profile in particular, please contact the UBC Undergraduate Admissions Office.

 

 

Why study Manufacturing Engineering at UBC?

Why study Manufacturing Engineering at UBC?

What is Manufacturing Engineering?

Are you hoping to study engineering, but you’re not sure which branch to focus on? Manufacturing engineering might be one of the lesser-known fields, but it’s also one of the most important, combining the popular disciplines of mechanical, mechatronics, and material engineering.

As a manufacturing engineer, you’ll be tasked with using hi-tech and automation skills to turn raw material into new products in the most effective, efficient, and economical way you can. It’s your job to research and develop tools, processes, machines, and equipment, and to combine them all to meet your goals.

At UBC, you’ll get the chance to study manufacturing processes, from designing concepts and creating mechanical parts all the way through to product delivery. Studying on UBC’s Okanagan or Vancouver campus – or both – you’ll gain the technical skills to set you up for a broad range of jobs in the industry.

 

Why choose Manufacturing Engineering?

Why should you pick the Manufacturing Engineering program at UBC? Here are five reasons:

 

  1. It’s the first degree of its kind in B.C. There aren’t many examples of fully-fledged manufacturing programs at research universities in Canada, and none in British Columbia. Manufacturing is one of the most important industries in the country, accounting for 10 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP). UBC’s program offers you the specialized education at a world top 40 university to enter this important market.

 

  1. You’ll get to spend time on both the Okanagan and Vancouver campuses. Prospective UBC students typically have to pick either the Okanagan or Vancouver campus for their program, but Manufacturing Engineering is different. For your fourth-year final project, you’ll have the chance to specialize, and can choose either production management on the Okanagan campus or technical manufacturing on the Vancouver campus.

 

  1. You’ll get to master some cutting-edge manufacturing tools. Automation and digitalization are essential to the field, and UBC’s manufacturing program has been designing to train students in state-of-the-art techniques. You’ll learn how to master artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, and manipulate advanced materials during the program.

 

  1. You can study abroad for a semester, and gain course credit. As a Manufacturing Engineering student, you’ll have the chance to broaden your academic and cultural experience by spending time at a leading university in another country. You can choose to be a part of the Coordinated International Experience(CIE) program and study for a semester in Asia, Australia, and Europe, gaining credit for your UBC degree while you’re there.

 

  1. There are plenty of opportunities for co-op placements. As part of your program, you can participate in the Engineering co-opfor up to 20 months of paid engineering work experience to apply the skills you’ve learned in the classroom. Participating in a co-op offers a competitive advantage when you’re looking for the best job after you graduate, and UBC has the largest engineering co-op program in Western Canada and one of the most successful in the country.