Programs spotlight: Engineering and technology

Programs spotlight: Engineering and technology

Are you looking for a future-proof profession? Pursuing an education in a STEM field is a surefire way to equip yourself with the skills and knowledge to secure a bright career path. UBC’s engineering and technology programs will challenge you intellectually, connect you with a community of dedicated scientists and engineers, and open a world of opportunities.

Explore your program options

Mechanical Engineering

In the Mechanical Engineering program at UBC Okanagan you’ll investigate practical, hands-on ways of creating and improving physical systems to meet the demand of modern industries – from aircraft and energy systems to biomedical, mechatronics, and manufacturing. The program is accredited by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers and will help you master fundamental engineering concepts while learning more about the application of practical design skills.

 

The student scoop

Joses Akampurira, Engineering

Meet Joses, a Civil Engineering student who found that volunteering and getting involved was the best path to success at UBC.

Wood Products Processing

The Wood Products Processing program at UBC Vancouver begins with foundational courses in math, physics, and chemistry, and transitions into developing your knowledge of wood and material science, and wood processing technologies. You’ll study in the award-winning Forest Sciences Centre and the Centre for Advanced Wood Processing, Canada’s national centre of excellence for wood products. In your senior years, you’ll learn how to analyze and optimize manufacturing operations, finishing up with a major project drawing on your personal interests.

 

 

The student scoop

Annelies Tjebbes, Engineering

Meet Annelies, an Electrical Engineering alumna who used her skills and education to improve the lives of others.

Data Science

UBC’s Data Science program at the UBC Okanagan is grounded in statistics – to formulate relevant questions and determine the answer based on data – and computer science – to manipulate and visualize data efficiently. You’ll learn more about decision-making supported by data while taking courses in machine learning, network science, data analytics, and much more. Your courses will prepare you for graduate studies, or for careers in e-commerce, finance, government, genomics, entertainment and sports, management, and other areas that increasingly rely on data sets.

 

A professor’s perspective

Dr. Jonathan Holzman, UBC Okanagan Engineering professor

Meet Dr. Holzman, an Engineering professor at UBC’s Okanagan campus who is building bridges between faculty, students, industry, and the Okanagan community.

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineers use engineering tools like design, modelling, and fabrication, and apply them to science and healthcare issues. They develop new technologies that enable doctors, therapists, biotech companies, and researchers to improve human health. As a Biomedical Engineering student at UBC Vancouver, you’ll take specialized courses to help you build a unique foundation in engineering, biology, math, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, design, and the healthcare system. In your third year, you’ll have the chance to customize your degree based on your interests.

 


See a full list of engineering and technology programs at UBC


Programs spotlight: Business and economics

Programs spotlight: Business and economics

Maybe you started a lemonade stand as a kid, or you watched the world markets before you could even buy stock. Perhaps you’ve got a shrewd mind for business, or a curiosity for commerce. UBC’s business and economics programs can foster that budding interest and help you hone in on your niche, whether you have leadership ambitions and dreams of the C-suite, or you want to get in the weeds as a business analyst.

UBC’s range of programs and the opportunities for specialization within them can take you where you want to go after graduation.

 

Explore your program options

Management

Are you looking to use your leadership skills to make a difference in the world? In the Bachelor of Management at UBC Okanagan, you’ll learn how to incorporate social, financial, and environmental sustainability into the way organizations are run. You’ll finish the degree with hands-on experience creating real-life management solutions for one of UBC’s partner organizations. After graduating, you’ll be ready to work within your community, launch your own business, or empower organizational change.

 

The student scoop

Zachary Bingley UBC Student Story

Meet Zachary, a UBC Okanagan Management program grad who is now employed by one of his teachers on a project that helps reduce food insecurity in the Okanagan area.

 

Manufacturing Engineering

As a manufacturing engineer, you’ll be tasked with turning raw material into new products in the most effective, efficient, and economical way you can. It’s your job to research and develop tools, processes, machines, and equipment, and to combine them all to meet your goals. At UBC, you’ll get the chance to master the entire manufacturing process, from designing concepts and creating mechanical parts all the way through to product delivery. Studying Manufacturing Engineering at UBC Okanagan or UBC Vancouver – or both – you’ll gain the technical skills to set you up for a broad range of jobs in the industry.

 

Commerce

The Bachelor of Commerce at UBC Vancouver will provide you with a solid foundation of business basics and management skills you’ll need to thrive in your chosen career. Sharpen your critical thinking, problem solving, communication, organization, and leadership while you study a diverse range of course offerings that allow you to tailor your degree to your interests and career aspirations. Specialization options include accounting; business technology management; entrepreneurship; finance; general business management; global supply chain and logistics management; marketing; operations and logistics; organizational behaviour and human resources; and real estate.

 

The student scoop

Arielle Lynn, UBC Commerce

Meet Arielle, a Commerce student who was thrilled by the range of learning opportunities and experiences that UBC has to offer.

 

Food and Resource Economics

As climate change continues to threaten species and cultures, a booming industry has emerged around foodstuffs and natural resources. In the Bachelor of Science in Food and Resource Economics at UBC Vancouver, you’ll learn what the limitations and solutions are for optimizing the global food supply, and find out how best to deal with the world’s diminishing natural resources. In addition to gaining deep subject knowledge, you’ll discover how to work with large data sets and develop your critical thinking and analytical skills. During your studies, you’ll be able to take a number of business management electives, allowing you to finish the program ready to work in the food, agricultural, and natural resource sectors.

 


See a full list of business and economics programs at UBC


Should you join the Land One study option in first year?

Should you join the Land One study option in first year?

Transitioning from high school to university can seem daunting at first. To make the move as easy as possible, UBC offers a selection of first-year study options designed to help you build a community and take the stress out of registering for classes.

If you have been accepted into the Forestry or Land and Food Systems faculties, you are eligible to apply for the Land One study option.

 

What is Land One?

Land One includes a selection of core courses in Biology, Economics, Math, and English, as well as an integrative seminar. You’ll take all of these key classes with the 50 to 60 students who are admitted to the study option. You will also take part in a seminar, where you’ll enjoy hands-on experiences, build relationships with your instructors, and learn how to solve the problems that are facing our land.

 

Why should you choose a first-year study option?

If you’re looking to make new friends from your first day, Land One could be the right path for you. You’ll benefit from smaller class sizes during select courses and your seminar group, a dedicated study space, and low student-to-instructor ratios.

 

Is Land One right for you?

To take part in Land One, you’ll need to take all of the classes set out in the prearranged timetable, which will provide you with 15 credits. On top of that, you’ll have time to choose additional courses in your first year and build your own educational path.

Land One’s seminar course covers a range of issues related to land use, climate change, food security, and sustainability. Much of your time will be spent discussing and addressing how to solve these problems, and you’ll also take part in some hands-on activities. You’ll visit the UBC Farm to learn more about sustainable food systems, and enjoy a two-day field trip to UBC’s Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, where you’ll experience the coastal old-growth rainforest first-hand.

If you’re in Forestry, Land One is particularly useful if you plan to major in Forest Resources Management or if you’re taking your Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources Conservation.

If you’re in Land and Food Systems, you’re eligible for enrolment in Land One if you’re taking a Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology, or a Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition, and Health. Land One will prepare you for all majors across those two programs.

 

How to apply

Applications to Land One open in January 2020, and the deadline is May 31, 2020. Once you have been accepted onto your Forestry or Land and Food Systems degree program, you will need to submit an online application through Land One’s website. As part of the process, you’ll be asked to write a letter of intent (500 words maximum) explaining why you want to join the Land One cohort.

Enrolment in the study option may require additional high school courses not required for admission, so it’s important to check the requirements online.

 

Which Arts first-year study option is right for you?

Which Arts first-year study option is right for you?

After you’ve been admitted to the Bachelor of Arts degree, you’ll have to decide which courses to take when registration opens in June. That might seem like a long way off, but it’s worth thinking in advance about how you might like to structure your timetable.

There are two ways to shape your Arts degree. The first, the Custom Timetable, lets you pick the classes you’re most interested in and build your own schedule. The second lets you join a predesigned course schedule for your first year, where you’ll take nearly all of your classes with the same people.

For Arts students, there are two of these options to choose from: Arts One and the Coordinated Arts Program (CAP).

 

What are Arts One and CAP?

Arts One and CAP allow students to study together in small classes (between 20 and 100 students). Each brings courses and ideas together across different disciplines – for example literature, history, and philosophy – by focusing on a shared topic or theme.

To complete either study option, you’ll need to take all of the courses, which are collectively worth 18 credits. You can also take up to two additional courses of your choice each semester.

 

Why should you choose Arts One or CAP?

Arts One and CAP ease the transition from high school to university by offering standard timetables, coordinated assignment schedules, access to an exclusive study space, dedicated academic advisors, and support from your fellow students and faculty.

Both study options admit a small number of students – around 100 in Arts One, and about 100 per stream in CAP. Because you’ll spend most of your time with your cohort – sometimes in groups as small as four in Arts One, and 25 in CAP – you’ll find it easier to make friends. You’ll also work closely with your professors, helping you to make personal connections with faculty. Taking Arts One or CAP sets you up for a variety of degree pathways, and allows you to satisfy the first-year writing and literature requirements.

 

What’s the difference between Arts One and CAP?

Arts One

Arts One is a single, integrated course that is led by five instructors who work together to create the assignments and a reading list based on the year’s theme. Previous themes have included topics such as Appearance and Reality; Dangerous Questions, Forbidden Knowledge; and Authority and Resistance.

You’ll read and discuss classical and contemporary texts and their influence on culture and society, including novels, philosophical and political texts, films, drama, graphic memoirs, and more. The professors take turns to give the weekly lectures, and you’ll work closely with one instructor who will lead your twice-weekly seminar discussions (20 students) and once-weekly tutorials, where you and three other students will read and evaluate each other’s essays.

 

CAP

In CAP, you’ll get to choose from one of five streams, each offering a different combination of courses from across the Faculty of Arts. Stream topics have included Global Citizens; Individual and Society; Law and Society; Politics, Philosophy, and English; and Media Studies, and allow students and faculty to discuss ideas from various perspectives.

While your CAP courses are separate, faculty work together to connect the concepts and issues you’ll study, and to make sure your deadlines won’t overlap. Like Arts One, CAP classes are smaller than if you choose to create your own Custom Timetable, ranging from 25 students in the writing course to around 100 to 125 students in a lecture.

 

How to apply

To sign up for Arts One or for CAP, log into the Student Service Centre on your registration day in June and select Arts One or the Standard Timetable (STT) for your chosen CAP stream. If you’re interested in Arts One, you can also apply in advance to reserve a spot.

 

 

Programs spotlight: math, chemistry, and physics

Programs spotlight: math, chemistry, and physics

You possess a sharp, analytical mind. You like numbers, but you want to venture beyond what’s on the page – into complex analyses, real-world problems, and bigger ideas. At UBC, your program opportunities in the fields of math, chemistry, or physics are immense, and your breadth of career options is equally matched.

Want to learn about the laws and forces of nature while gaining practical laboratory experience? Are you keen to take math courses that emphasize powerful and versatile modes of thought, including abstraction and logical analysis? Do you hope to study at the intersection of math, physics, and physical science while learning more about the planets and their environments? There are a number of math, chemistry or physics programs at UBC Okanagan and UBC Vancouver where you can find your niche.

Explore your program options

Astronomy

The Astronomy program at UBC Vancouver uses principles of physics and mathematics to investigate the fundamental nature of the universe and its evolution; the properties of galaxies; and the birth, evolution, and death of stars and black holes. You can apply this knowledge to solve problems in navigation, space flight, and satellite communications, as well as to develop the instrumentation and techniques used to observe and collect astronomical data. Learn more about Astronomy at UBC by reading about Michelle Kunimoto’s journey in the program.

 

The student scoop

Michelle Kunimoto, UBC Astronomy

Meet Michelle, an Astronomy student who shares the details of discovering a new planet – and what that discovery means for her future and the search for life on other planets.

 

Statistics

The Statistics program, which is available at UBC Okanagan and UBC Vancouver, is the science of understanding and managing uncertainty. You’ll learn different methods and theories to examine data and solve real-world problems. The program will provide you with a solid grounding in the theoretical, computational, and applied aspects of statistical science, and will prepare you for a career in a wide range of organizations, including government agencies, private companies, or financial institutions.

Environmental Chemistry

The Environmental Chemistry program at UBC Okanagan offers you a solid education in the four key areas of chemistry – analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry – along with core courses in environmental chemistry and other fields, including biology and earth and environmental science. This program can be a stepping stone to medical, dental, or veterinary degrees, or set you up for a future working in environmental protection, private and public analytical laboratories, and more.

 

The student scoop

Jeffrey Kerkovius, Chemistry, UBC

Meet Jeffrey, a Chemistry student at UBC Okanagan and undergraduate researcher of the year in 2015. Read about why his time at UBC has been the best of his life.

 

Mathematics

In the field of mathematics, you can choose from seven programs across both campuses: Bachelor of Science in Mathematics at both campuses, Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics at both campuses, Bachelor of Science in Mathematical Sciences at both campuses, and Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Economics at UBC Vancouver. Depending on your specific interests within mathematics, you could focus on something as technical as analyzing the electrical impulses in an animal’s nervous system, or concentrate on pure mathematics or applied mathematics.

Physics

Do you want to become a versatile scientist? In Physics – available at both UBC Okanagan and UBC Vancouver – you’ll study the material world and the energy that drives it, from the smallest particles like neutrinos and Higgs bosons to the very largest structures in the universe, and ultimately the universe itself. Complement your physics studies with a wide variety of science electives to develop a comprehensive background in other disciplines.

 

The student scoop

Leonardo Moutinho Caffarello Student Story

Meet Leonardo, who followed his passion for space exploration from Brazil to Canada, where he discovered a universe of learning.

 


See a full list of math, chemistry, and physics programs at UBC


Which Science first-year study option is right for you?

Which Science first-year study option is right for you?

Once you’ve decided to apply for the Bachelor of Science degree, it’s time to start thinking about how you’d like to structure your first-year courses.

There are two ways to shape your degree. The first lets you pick the classes you’re most interested in, and build your own timetable. The second lets you join a predesigned course schedule for your first year, where you’ll take nearly all of your classes with the same people.

For Science students, there are two of these study options to choose from: Science One, and the Coordinated Science Program (CSP).

 

What are Science One and CSP?

Science One and CSP offer courses that integrate Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics. Both provide small class sizes, dedicated study spaces, and lower student-to-instructor ratios, but have very different curricula and difficulty levels.

 

Why should you choose Science One or CSP?

Science One and CSP make the transition from high school to university smoother with standard timetables, coordinated assignment schedules, a set space in the library to study, and support from your fellow students and faculty.

Because Science One and CSP take a small number of students, you’ll find yourself spending a lot of time with your cohort, which will help you make friends. You’ll also be taught by a select number of professors, which aids in making personal connections with your teachers. There will be the opportunity to take part in peer-group workshops or field trips, depending on the study option you choose.

 

How to pick which option is best for you

Science One

Science One is challenging. It has a competitive application process, and teaches UBC’s highest level of first-year science to a tight-knit group of students. You’ll be one of just 75 individuals, and will be supported by eight instructors, offering you an excellent student-to-professor ratio of 9:1. All Science One teachers attend each other’s classes to dynamically shape your curriculum, and you’ll share your own work and study space with your instructors. You’ll also take part in weekly workshops, learn from guest lecturers, and have extra instruction in science literacy and computer programming. The curriculum includes mentorship on two major research projects – the results of which can be published in undergraduate journals – and you’ll attend student conferences and enjoy two field trips.

Science One is also a social experience. You’ll help elect a student representative to sit in on the Science One Team meetings and the Science Undergraduate Society (SUS), and take part in mentorship and social activities such as barbecues, the Winter Formal, and talent shows.

 

CSP

CSP aims to build more a supportive learning community than if you choose to create your own timetable. With a pupil-teacher ratio of 28:1, you’ll have smaller class sizes than a standard first-year science student, and will attend labs primarily made up of your CSP peers. The program provides you with a dedicated space for you and others to study and socialize, and you’ll take part in electing a CSP student council which plans activities such as movie nights, ski trips, and dinners. You’ll also get to take part in weekly two-hour workshops that provide extra learning support, and build essential scientific skills.

 

How to apply

If you want to take part in Science One, you’ll need to submit an application at the same time or shortly after you apply to UBC’s Bachelor of Science degree, as registration opens on December 1, 2019.

To join CSP, you can sign up when the standard online registration system opens in June.

 

Five things you never knew about UBC Forestry

Five things you never knew about UBC Forestry

Do you imagine Forestry to be all about trees and lumberjacks? Not even close!

UBC’s Faculty of Forestry is the largest of its kind in Canada and is ranked top three in the world for its education and research. It offers the chance to study one of six science-based degrees, which will help you master topics including conservation and globalization, forest genetics, ecology, resource management, urban biodiversity, and more.

UBC Forestry also provides you with ample opportunities to get out of the classroom. You’ll be able to focus on the areas of your degree you find most interesting with on-site research, travel, and co-op work placements. A Forestry degree will challenge you academically, and provide a foundation for a wide selection of sought-after careers.

 

Why choose UBC Forestry?

 

You may already know that UBC Forestry has this year added a new degree for you to study. Here are five more facts that make the faculty unique.

 

  1. The UBC Forest Sciences Centre is built to look like a forest inside, with live plants and trees in the atrium and a treehouse study area exclusively for Forestry students.

 

  1. UBC Forestry has two research forests totaling more than 15,000 hectares in Maple Ridge and Williams Lake, British Columbia. UBC Vancouver is also surrounded by 750 hectares of forest, letting you study in a wooded environment.

 

  1. Every year during Forestry Week, the UBC Forestry Undergraduate Society paints Omar the Truck and parades it around campus.

 

  1. The Centre for Advanced Wood Processing helped design the victory ceremony medal podium for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

 

  1. UBC Forestry professor Suzanne Simard has her very own TED talk and was featured on an episode of Radiolab.

 

The student scoop

Noa Berman Mayer UBC Student Story

Want to learn more about studying in the Forestry Faculty? Meet Noa, who began her UBC journey in the Faculty of Arts before she chose to focus exclusively on environmentalism and conservation with a Forestry degree.

 

Programs spotlight: People, culture, and society

Programs spotlight: People, culture, and society

Are you fascinated by the forces that shape human history? Do you want to learn more about the evolution of individual communities and peoples? Do you want to explore topics at the intersection of politics, art, culture, literature, music, design, and geography? One of UBC’s people, culture, and society programs could be for you.

Explore your program options 

Indigenous Studies

The Indigenous Studies program at UBC Okanagan explores the perspectives, histories, and contemporary issues of Indigenous peoples from around the world. You’ll examine key topics such as Indigenous governance, the justice system, land claims, traditional ecological knowledge, and other critical components of Indigenous heritage. This program will prepare you for a career in government, environmental assessment and resource management, Indigenous leadership, or Indigenous-focused non-profit or community organizations.

 

The student scoop

Ella Maija Tailfeathers, First Nations Studies, UBC

Meet Elle-Máijá, a First Nations Studies undergrad and groundbreaking filmmaker who discovered her passion for Indigenous representation in media.

 

Religion, Literature, and the Arts

Religion, Literature, and the Arts at UBC Vancouver is the only program designed to allow you to study religions across different cultures. You’ll gain a deep understanding of Western, Near Eastern, and Asian religions and traditions, and as well as those practiced in other geographic regions. You’ll also have the opportunity to explore complex relationships between history, culture, language, art, and music, and to study abroad in one of 42 different countries.

 

Gender and Women’s Studies

Gain a deeper understanding of sexuality, femininity, embodiment, and social justice in the Gender and Women’s Studies program at UBC Okanagan. This dynamic and interdisciplinary program focuses on historical and contemporary roles of gender in global cultures. You’ll build theoretical and research skills through courses in the humanities, social sciences, and cultural studies.

 

The student scoop

Emmy Chahal, Cultural Studies, UBC Okanagan

Meet Emmy, a Cultural Studies and Gender and Women’s Studies undergraduate who learned to question more, and judge less.

 

Social Work

Social work is a profession that lets you promote social justice at individual, family, organizational, community, and societal levels. The Social Work program at UBC Vancouver is a two-year degree that will prepare you for the different areas of the profession, including direct practice, group work, and developing communities. You’ll gain a deep understanding of the values of human dignity, social equality, and social justice, and learn through a variety of real-world field placements.

 


See a full list of people, culture, and society programs at UBC